Sunday, 21 August 2016

Sunday WW1 Remembered...




War Artists of WW1


Forty years years ago I paid my first visit to the Imperial War Museum in London and I was stunned by the stark images of WW1 which were so graphically portrayed by the war artists. These images have stayed with me forever. I can remember standing before this painting and just looking, looking, looking....



The Menin Road
Paul Nash
1919


Imperial War Museum, London
Source :Wikipedia



Paul Nash born in London in 1889 was a surrealist painter who produced some of the most iconic images of the First World War. He enlisted in 1914 as a private for the Home Service in the Artists Rifles. He was sent to the Western Front in February 1917 as a second lieutenant in the Hampshire Regiment. Based at St Eloi on the Ypres Salient, Nash endured the war until an accident in May 1917 invalided him back to London. During his recuperation, Nash produced a series of drawings in ink, chalk and watercolour which depicted his personal images of the war. He exhibited these pictures to great acclaim, which resulted in his approaching Charles Masterman who was head of the government's War Propaganda Bureau. In November 1917, Nah returned to the Ypres Salient as an official war artist.





Spring in the Trenches, Ridge Wood , 1917
Paul Nash

Imperial War Museum London
Source :Wikipedia


The official war artists were a group of artists employed to produce specific works at the behest of the government which could be used as information, propaganda or simply to record, for prosperity, what was happening  on the Western Front.

Muirhead Bone was appointed the first official war artist in May 1916. Bone was born in Glasgow in 1876 and was an etcher, dry point and water colour artist who was known for his architectural and industrial art. Bone was later replaced as official war artist by his brother-in-law, Francis Dodd.

Francis Dodd  was born in Holyhead in 1874. He was a portrait painter, landscape artist and print maker. He produced over 30 portraits of senior official military figures.

In 1917, other artists were sent out to France, these included Eric Kennington, William Orpen, Paul Nash, Christopher Nevinson, William Rothstein.





An Infantryman Resting

Eric Kennington

An Infantryman Resting Art.IWMART1038.jpg
Sourse:Wikipedia

None of the artists could fail to be moved emotionally by what they saw and witnessed



Paul Nash said......"I am no longer an artist interested and curious, I am a messenger who will bring back word from the men who are fighting to those who want the war to go on for ever. Feeble, inarticulate, will be my message, but it will have a bitter truth, and may it burn their lousy souls...."






~***~



Friday, 19 August 2016

Review ~ On the Account by Helen Hollick



The Sea Witch Voyages 

Book Five


30964803
Silverwood Books
July 2016


A bit of blurb..


Captain Jesamiah Acorne is in trouble. Again. Arrested for treason and smuggling, believing his beloved ship, Sea Witch, lies wrecked on England’s North Devon coast, his only hope of escaping the noose is for someone to quash the charges. That someone turns out to be his ex-lover – but there’s a price to pay. 

He needs to find a boy who has disappeared, and a valuable casket that more than one person wants to get their hands on. When people start getting murdered and Barbary pirates kidnap his wife, Tiola, his priorities rapidly change – but who is lying about what? Is returning to piracy a wise idea? Is Tiola having an affair with her mysterious Night-Walker ‘friend’? 

Meanwhile, Tiola has her own battle to fight – keeping herself and Jesamiah alive!




My thoughts about the book..

There's something rather special about meeting again with established characters and in On The Account, the fifth book in the Sea Witch Voyages, the author has again brought to vivid life the adventures of swashbuckling Captain Jesamiah Acorne and his mysterious wife, Tiola.

When authors seek to maintain stability within an established series, there is sometimes a danger that stories can become diluted, but this is not the case with this series, which seems to go from strength to strength. Maintaining continuity, whilst at the same time giving readers something new to discover is what makes reading the Sea Witch Voyages so much fun. I enjoyed this story because it’s little bit more mystical than its predecessors, slightly otherworldly in places, but always at the forefront is the author’s keen eye for detail and a strong sense of history, both real and imagined. The fine attention to detail and the author’s unique story telling ability always ensures that Captain Jesamiah and his adventures never fail to hit the mark. 

To say more about the minutiae of the story would be to spoil the overall effect but what I can say is that the eighteenth century comes alive in splendid detail, from Jesamiah’s initial incarceration in a gloomy Bristol gaol, to the terror of kidnap and the threat of coercion, there is never a dull moment, either for Jesamiah and his wife, or for those characters who form a major part of this rollicking good adventure.

As with any series, it is of course best to start reading from book one, however, it is perfectly possible to read and enjoy On the Account as a standalone story.



Best Read with…A ripe French brandy and platters of aromatic mutton stew...







Helen Hollick lives with her family in North Devon, England, in an eighteenth-century farmhouse, surrounded by thirteen acres of fields and woodland. A variety of pets include horses, two Exmoor ponies, dogs, cats, chickens, ducks, and geese. A passionate supporter of indie, Helen is Managing Editor for the Historical Novel Society Indie Reviews. Her main passion is her pirate character, Captain Jesamiah Acorne of The Sea Witch Voyages, which carry the quality endorsement of Indie B.R.A.G. medallions. Helen is also published traditionally in the US, and became a USA Today Bestseller with 'The Forever Queen' (titled 'A Hollow Crown' in the UK) – the story of Saxon Queen, Emma of Normandy. Her novel 'Harold the King' (titled 'I Am the Chosen King' in the US) is an acclaimed re-telling of events that led to the 1066 Battle of Hastings. Her Pendragon’s Banner Trilogy, set in the fifth century, is widely acclaimed as a different telling of the Arthurian Myth. Helen is published in various languages including Turkish, Italian and German.


Helen Hollick



Find Helen on her website Click here

Follow on Twitter @HelenHollick

Visit on Facebook Click here





My thanks to Helen for sharing Captain Jesamiah's latest adventures with me.



~***~

Tuesday, 16 August 2016

Blog Hop ~ My Husband's Wives by Faith Hogan



Jaffareadstoo is delighted to be part of 



My Husband's Wives Blog Hop






I am delighted to welcome the author Faith Hogan who is sharing her inspiration for Carlinville, Evie's home in My Husband's Wives...



Photo by kind permission of the author




Carlinville – The Silent Character!

My debut novel – My Husband’s Wives is a book firmly set in Irish soil. The action of the novel takes place in Dublin, and while it’s not the Dublin of Roddy Doyle or Brendan Beehan, it is the Dublin of today. For the most part, it’s middle class suburbia, the home of average people going about ordinary lives.

Evie Considine lives in an old Victorian house, set high in the hills of Howth. Anyone who knows Dublin will know how strikingly beautiful Howth is. From its headland on a clear day, you can see across the Irish Sea into Wales. Along the Dublin coastline, you can pick out the Poolbeg towers, occasional sandy coves and at night, the winking lights of a city steeped in literary tradition. Carlinville, Evie’s home, has retained the beauty of its past, despite Evie’s indifference. It is a place that cries out to be filled with people, smell of beeswax and gleam in the full sun of care and love; it is a house that yearns to be a home. 




 This image of Frewin House  is used with the kind permission of its owners and like Carlinville  House, it too is a fine example of Irish Victorian architecture. 


With Queen Victoria, came a new kind of living. The elite sought to make a mark of their own and built houses like the one featured here. The architecture was softer and more feminine than its predecessors were. It is also less widespread in our capital city than the great red squares of the Georgians.  Dublin city is known mostly for its great Georgian squares. Today, tall, redbrick identical houses, built to a perfect precision in the 1700’s are being opened up around the city, fetching prices now that would have made their original owners blush. Very many have seen the highs and lows of Irish society, beginning as homes to the well to do, but eventually, when they became unfashionable being relegated to the poor. Tenement living in Dublin was at its height in the early twentieth century. By 1912, Dublin had the worst housing conditions in the UK, the wealthy had fled the city centre to set up home in the suburbs and the grand houses of the Georgians became little more than squats with high rents. Huge families living to a room or two, with little in the way of basic sanitary provisions led quickly to the disintegration of those once beautiful squares. The nineteen eighties saw a revival of the squares, but the restoration is slow and expensive, so still there are many Georgian houses in danger of disappearance. Thankfully, the Victorian houses were lucky to have been modish long enough and at the right time to avoid falling out of fashion to the same extent.

Like the women in My Husband’s Wives, Carlinville manages to come to life and its journey in the novel mirrors that of its mistress. It has, for too long been relegated to second place, while always providing what Paul Starr needed in life. In his death, like his wives, it too is gifted with so much more than it expected.

While Dublin features in the novel, it is contemporary Dublin. The liberties, although they are steeped amidst the history of the Vikings are home to a sea of constant traffic, bijoux antique shops and the ubiquitous coffee shops on every corner of every city of the world.

I love Dublin, I think anyone who visits the city, if they have a love of writers or books, will love it. There are landmarks here that mark it apart from any other place in the world. The city begins with the Book of Kells, a stone’s throw away, the house of The Dead, take the dart and you will arrive out at Joyce’s Martello Tower. Every other street has a pub, a doorway or a sculpture to mark the journey of some writer that has touched even the darkest soul. However, My Husband’s Wives is not a story about Dublin – it is a story about jealousy, forgiveness and ultimately love and the truth is, that’s a universal tale. It doesn’t matter if you live in Seattle or Surrey, Sidney or Stephenville – love is love and really it is all we have that is worth having at the end.

Faith  x




29606569
Aria Fiction
2016
(Head of Zeus)



A bit of Blurb about the book..

Better to have loved and lost, than never loved.

Paul Starr, Ireland's leading cardiologist dies in a car crash with a pregnant young women by his side.

United in their grief and the love of one man, four women are thrown together in an attempt to come to terms with life after Paul. They soon realise they never really knew him at all.

The love they shared for Paul in his life and which incensed a feeling of mistrust and dislike for each other, in his death turns into the very thing that bonds them and their children to each other forever.

As they begin to form unlikely friendships, Paul's deaths proves to be the catalyst that enables them to become the people they always wanted to be.




About the Author

Faith Hogan was born in Ireland.  She gained an Honours Degree in English Literature and Psychology from Dublin City University and a Postgraduate Degree from University College, Galway.  She has worked as a fashion model, an event’s organiser and in the intellectual disability and mental health sector.

She was a winner in the 2014 Irish Writers Centre Novel Fair – an international competition for emerging writers.


Her debut novel, ‘My Husband’s Wives,’ is a contemporary women’s fiction novel set in Dublin. It will be published by Aria, (Head of Zeus) on 1st of May 2016.   She is currently working on her next novel.  
























My Husband’s Wives, was published on 1st of May 2016 by Aria (Head of Zeus). It is currently available on Amazon and all good E-reading sites. She lives in the west of Ireland with her husband, children, a very fat cat called Norris and a selection of (until recently!) idle writerly mugs and cups.

You can find out more about Faith on her website Click here

Find on Facebook Click here

Follow on Twitter @GerHogan

Amazon UK
Amazon.com



Huge thanks to Faith for inviting Jaffareadstoo to be part of this Blog Hop
 and for such a fascinating insight into the inspiration for Carlinsville.
Jaffa and I wish you continued success with your writing.





~***~

Monday, 15 August 2016

Guest Author ~ Anne Allen



I am delighted to welcome back to Jaffareadstoo










I'm really excited to share the news that Anne has a new novel out.
Echoes of Time is a continuation of the Guernsey Novels Series



13 August 2016



A Bit of blurb..





And here for your delight is a tantalising extract from Echoes of Time..




Chapter One


Guernsey – 1987



Olive was cooking her usual meagre supper of scrambled eggs on toast when the sound of heavy footsteps outside made her jump. No-one ever visited and this was how she liked it. Always had. Her heart pounded as she moved the pan off the blackened range and turned to face the back door. Unlocked as was the custom in safe little Guernsey. Or was it safe? Grabbing a knife she watched, immobile, as the knob turned and the door began to open. The man stood silhouetted against the early evening sky and she stared hard at his shape, puzzled. There was something familiar about the slope of the shoulders and the angle of his head. Her mouth went dry in the moment before the door closed and he moved into the light.


It couldn’t be! Not after all this time…She felt her legs tremble and leant back against the range.


‘Hello, Olive. Bet you didn’t expect to see me again, did you?’ He chuckled, humourlessly.


She hid the knife up her sleeve and pulled the darned cardigan around her thin body. Old memories surfaced as she fought to stay calm.


‘We…we heard you were dead. You didn’t come back–’


‘No, well, I found someone and something better, didn’t I? But it doesn’t look as if you have.’ His gaze was contemptuous as he looked her up and down, and Olive was conscious of how unkempt she looked. Poverty does that to a person. Whereas he was immaculately dressed in what looked like a designer suit. A successful man. She watched, helpless, as his gaze wandered over the kitchen, and she registered, for the first time in years, how dirty and shabby it looked. The kitchen which had once been kept spotless. Feelings of shame, mixed with overriding fear, flooded her mind. What did he want?


His eyes alighted on the only personal item in the room. And the last thing she wanted him to see. She moved forward, attempting to block his view, but he pushed her aside and picked up the photo in its cheap wooden frame.


‘Who’s this?’ he demanded, his face flushed with anger. 


A look she knew all too well.


Her stomach clenched. Could she lie? Pretend it was someone else? As her head whirled with possibilities he seized her arm, twisting it. She cried out in pain and the knife clattered onto the granite floor. Swiftly he grabbed it while still holding onto her arm. Olive’s knees buckled.


He thrust the knife towards her chest and she screamed.


‘Please…’


‘Don’t even think of lying,’ he hissed.


‘It’s…it’s my…our daughter–’


The world went black.





©Anne Allen








Anne Allen lives in Devon, by her beloved sea. She has three children and her daughter and two grandchildren live nearby. She was born in Rugby, to an English mother and Welsh father. As a result she spent many summers with her Welsh grandparents in Anglesey and learnt to love the sea. Her restless spirit has meant a number of moves which included Spain for a couple of years. The longest stay was in Guernsey for nearly fourteen years after falling in love with the island and the people. She contrived to leave one son behind to ensure a valid reason for frequent returns.

By profession Anne was a psychotherapist but has long had creative ‘itches’, learning to mosaic, paint furniture, interior design and sculpt. At the back of her mind the itch to write was always present but seemed too time-consuming for a single mum with a need to earn a living. Now retired from the 'day job', there’s more time to write and Anne has now published five books in The Guernsey Novels series (as at August 2016). A sixth will be published in 2017.




















To visit Anne on Facebook click here
To follow her on Twitter @AnneAllen21 or click here

Echoes of Time is now available to buy as an e-book or in papaerback.







Huge thanks to Anne for being my guest today 

and for sharing an extract from Echoes of Time with Jaffareadstoo



~***~

Sunday, 14 August 2016

Sunday WW1 Remembered...


Music of The First World War


"Till The Boys Come Home"



In 1914 Music Hall was by far the most popular form of entertainment and amongst the most well known performers were acts like, Marie Lloyd, George Formby Snr, Harry Lauder, Gertie Gitana and Harry Champion.

Initially at the outbreak of war in 1914 many of the popular songs were calls for recruitment with titles like "We don't want to lose you but we think you've got to go" but as the war progressed the sentiment changed to seeing the boys safely home and songs like "Keep The Home Fires Burning" bolstered morale, both at home and abroad.



Keep the Home Fires Burning, written by Ivor Novello with words by Lena Guilbert was first published on the 8th October 1914 as "Till The Boys Come Home". A new edition published in 1915 was entitled "Keep The Home Fires Burning"




Listen to a 2012 BBC Proms recording of

Keep the Home Fires Burning

Sung by Toby Spence






Keep The Home Fires Burning

Ivor Novello, Lena Guilbert 



Keep the Home-fires burning,
While your hearts are yearning,
Though your lads are far away
They dream of Home;
There's a silver lining

Through the dark cloud shining,
Turn the dark cloud inside out,
Till the boys come Home.

Overseas there came a pleading,
"Help a Nation in distress!"
And we gave our glorious laddies,
Honour made us do no less.

For no gallant Son of Freedom
To a tyrant's yoke should bend,
And a noble heart must answer
To the sacred call of "Friend!"

Keep the Home-fires burning,
While your hearts are yearning,
Though your lads are far away
They dream of Home;
There's a silver lining

Through the dark cloud shining,
Turn the dark cloud inside out,
Till the boys come Home.


~***~

Saturday, 13 August 2016

The author in my spotlight is ...Kate Braithwaite




Jaffareadstoo is delighted to introduce 






Author of Charlatan





Hi Kate and a very warm welcome to Jaffareadstoo. 

Thank you for spending time with us today and for telling us all about Charlatan 





Tell us a little about Kate Braithwaite, author.


I am originally from Edinburgh, but now live in the Brandywine Valley in Pennsylvania with my husband, three kids, two dogs, one cat and some fish. I studied English at Leeds University and have always had a real love of history as well as reading fiction. I used to be a teacher but now – along with writing - I mainly operate as short-order cook, laundry lady and taxi driver to my kids. I also write reviews and articles for the Historical Novel Society and Bookbrowse.com


Where did you get the first flash of inspiration for Charlatan?

Not long after becoming a mum for the first time I picked up a second-hand copy of Nancy Mitford’s book, The Sun King, thinking some non-fiction would be good for my brain cells while I was on maternity leave. Mitford describes the Affair of the Poisons, but not in huge detail. I had an immediate feeling of sympathy for Athénaïs, Madame de Montespan: the thirty-something mistress and mother of seven of the Louis XIV’s children who had to stand by and watch while the King abandoned her for a beautiful eighteen-year old. Learning that Athénaïs was suspected of involvement with fortune-tellers and poisoners - that there was a whole scandal I had never heard a whisper of before - really got me hooked.


Without giving too much away – what can you tell us about the story?

There are two narratives at play in Charlatan. The first is about Athénaïs, long-time mistress of Louis, struggling to come to terms with being replaced by a much younger woman. She drowns her sorrows in wine and gambling but her sister, Gabrielle, is determined that Athénaïs must win Louis back. At the same time, in Paris, a major police investigation is underway. The Château de Vincennes is filling up with fortune-tellers, magicians and priests, accused of poisoning and black masses, who claim to have clients within many of France’s most noble families. Assistant investigator, Louis Bezons, becomes entangled with a young female prisoner, one of several with a lot to say about Athénaïs and the lengths she has gone to over the years in order to keep Louis to herself. He wants to pursue the allegations against the King’s mistress but his superior, La Reynie, is not so sure. Athénaïs, meanwhile, has no idea how the past might be about to catch up with her.


Charlatan is very atmospheric – how much research did you need to do in order to bring the story to life and did you discover anything which surprised you about the court of Louis XIV?

Lots of research! In some ways it was like researching two different worlds: the criminal underworld of Paris and the claustrophobic court Louis created at Versailles. Although the novel takes place roughly in the years 1678 to 1681, I read a great deal about the court in the years preceding the events in the story in order to understand the relationship between Athénaïs and Louis and consider what her involvement with the Paris underworld might truly have been. One of my favourite primary sources is the letters Madame de Sévigné wrote to her daughter about life at Louis’ court. Her wonderfully gossipy and witty letters are a great source on everything from food to clothes to courtly bickering.


Whilst you are writing you must live with your characters. How did you feel about them when the book was finished? Did they turn out as expected?

It’s a weird thing. Some of them – particularly Athénaïs, Louis Bezons and the magician Lesage - were very clear to me from the start and I have huge affection for them, warts and all. Others changed as I wrote and developed in different drafts. Athénaïs’ sister, Gabrielle, for example, really developed as the story came together. She’s not the kindest of characters and I enjoy that about her. Louise de la Vallière, Louis’ first maîtresse-en-titre, who Athénaïs visits several times in the story, was also a pleasure to write. The scenes between those two are some of my favourites.


What were the challenges faced whilst writing the book?

The Affair of the Poisons is really very complex and I struggled to convey the sheer number of people caught up in the investigation. There were hundreds of prisoners making claims and counter claims and in the end I chose to amalgamate characters in some instances. I also had to omit aspects of the investigation altogether. The playwright, Racine, for example, was accused of poisoning his mistress by one of the characters in the novel, the fortune-teller La Voisin. I would have loved to include that somewhere but with fiction the reader expects a cohesive story and it just didn’t work with my plot. I was also very keen to keep as far as I could within the known historical record. I didn’t have any outcomes for any character that weren’t historically accurate so that constrained how the characters could behave. Writing like that is challenging, but its also great fun too.


Do you write the type of books you like to read and which authors influence you?

Years ago I read an interview with Fay Weldon where she said that most writers begin as readers and “end up writing the novel they want to read, if only because nobody else has got around to writing it.” That is completely true for me. I love historical fiction and if it has a really strong basis in fact, even better. Two writers I’ve read fairly recently and who do that just brilliantly are Naomi Wood and Susan Higginbotham. In Mrs Hemmingway, Wood creates all four of Hemmingway’s wives in compelling detail. In Hanging Mary, Susan Higginbotham tells the story of Mary Surratt, the first woman executed by the US government for her part in the assassination of Abraham Lincoln. I was totally gripped by both of those novels. I’m also a big fan of writers like Rose Tremain, Hilary Mantel and Sarah Waters and regularly manage to cook dinner with a crime novel in one hand and a spoon in the other.


What’s next - more historical fiction or something more contemporary?


I will be sticking with historical fiction. I’m working on completing a novel about a newly married couple that get caught up in the Popish Plot which took London by storm in 1678. It’s part love-story, part detective story and is set in a period of great turbulence and fear that I think has a lot of relevance for today’s world.



More about Charlatan..

How do you keep the love of the King of France?

1676. In a hovel in the centre of Paris, the fortune-teller La Voisin holds a black mass, summoning the devil to help an unnamed client keep the love of the King of France, Louis XIV.

Three years later, Athénaïs, Madame de Montespan, the King’s glamorous mistress, is nearly forty. She has borne Louis seven children but now seethes with rage as he falls for eighteen-year-old Angélique de Fontanges.

At the same time, police chief La Reynie and his young assistant Bezons have uncovered a network of fortune-tellers and poisoners operating in the city. Athénaïs does not know it, but she is about to be named as a favoured client of the infamous La Voisin.





About the Author


Kate Braithwaite was born and grew up in Edinburgh, Scotland. She has lived in England and Canada where she studied creative writing at Toronto University, receiving the Marina Nemat Award and the Random House/University of Toronto Student writing prize for her historical fiction. She is a member of the Historical Novel Society and a freelance writer for Bookbrowse.com. Kate lives with her family in Pennsylvania.














Find out more on Kate's website
More about the novel can be found here
Follow her on Twitter @KMBraithwaite
Visit her on Facebook




Huge thank you to Kate for being my author in the spotlight today

and for sharing her novel, Charlatan with us.








~*My Thoughts about Charlatan*~



I've long been fascinated by the French court of Louis XIV, and I've always rather fancied myself sweeping the long corridors of Versailles, but since I am not in possession , as yet, of a time travelling machine, I have to rely on the work of good authors, like Kate Braithwaite, to bring this period alive in my imagination.

From the very beginning of this story my imagination was fired and even as I turned the first page I was transported back to a dark and dirty time, back to a time where danger lurked in shadows and where good men, and bad, were toppled by greed and evil conspiracy. These were indeed dark and scurrilous times and walking in the footsteps of the King brought with it its own particular brand of danger. I loved way the Versaillian court comes to life, a life which is made all the more complex by the not so subtle ways of wily women and by the deep and devilish claims of those corrupt individuals whose lust for power overshadowed everything.

During the course of the novel there is much to take in, not just from a historical perspective but also from the lively way in which the characters go about their daily business. There is no doubt that the author has researched her subject very well and this shows in the fine attention to historical detail. I was completely beguiled by the sights, sounds and scents of seventeenth century France, which captured the very essence of Louis XIV’s time at Versailles, and which filled my senses with a rich and vibrant awareness of history coming alive on the page.



Best Read with ...A good French Claret and an earthy rabbit stew…






~***~



Friday, 12 August 2016

Legacy Launch Party And Fabulous Karl Lagerfeld Tote Bag Giveaway...



Jaffareadstoo is delighted to join with Hannah Fielding in her Legacy Launch Party

1st -21st August 2016





Hannah is launching Legacy, the third and final book in the 
Andalusian Nights Trilogy






Synopsis

A troubled young journalist finds her loyalties tested when love and desire unearth dark secrets from the past.

Spring, 2010. When Luna Ward, a science journalist from New York, travels halfway across the world to work undercover at an alternative health clinic in Cadiz, her ordered life is thrown into turmoil. 

The doctor she is to investigate, the controversial Rodrigo Rueda de Calderon, is not what she expected. With his wild gypsy looks and devilish sense of humour, he is intent upon drawing her to him. But how can she surrender to a passion that threatens all reason; and how could he ever learn to trust her when he discovers her true identity? Then Luna finds that Ruy is carrying a corrosive secret of his own…

Luna’s native Spanish blood begins to fire in this land of exotic legends, flamboyant gypsies and seductive flamenco guitars, as dazzling Cadiz weaves its own magic on her heart. Can Luna and Ruy’s love survive their families’ legacy of feuding and tragedy, and rise like the phoenix from the ashes of the past? 


Legacy is a story of truth, dreams and desire. But in a world of secrets you need to be careful what you wish for...




More about Hannah



Hannah Fielding is an incurable romantic. The seeds for her writing career were sown in early childhood, spent in Egypt, when she came to an agreement with her governess Zula: for each fairy story Zula told, Hannah would invent and relate one of her own. Years later – following a degree in French literature, several years of travelling in Europe, falling in love with an Englishman, the arrival of two beautiful children and a career in property development – Hannah decided after so many years of yearning to write that the time was now. Today, she lives the dream: writing full time at her homes in Kent, England, and the South of France, where she dreams up romances overlooking breath-taking views of the Mediterranean.
Hannah is a multi-award-winning novelist, and to date she has published five novels: Burning Embers, ‘romance like Hollywood used to make’, set in Kenya; The Echoes of Love, ‘an epic love story that is beautifully told’ set in Italy; and the Andalusian Nights Trilogy – IndiscretionMasquerade and Legacy – her fieriest novels yet, set in sunny, sultry Spain.


Twitter @fieldinghannah





There is also an amazing opportunity to win this Karl Lagerfeld Tote Bag


**Just enter this giveaway to be in win a chance of winning **








~**Good Luck**~